Monthly Archives: February 2010

Vancouver 2010 almost over- Go Canada

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Modeling versus plagarising

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Quotation of the Day: "The diagram-based analysis of sentences that Higher Lessons originated was the essential grammar pedagogy from 1880 through 1970. It was critiqued around the beginning of the century by several theorists, most notably Gertrude Buck, for its mechanical and linear nature . . . . Despite the criticism leveled at it, however, no system was put forward to supplant the Reed and Kellogg-based ‘sentence study’ method." Robert J. Connors, "Grammar in American College Composition: An Historical Overview," in The Territory of Language 3, 6 (Donald A. McQuade ed., 1986).
———————————— In simple English this means taking a solid sentence and changing a word within the sentence to learn sentence structure:
 
  Sample sentence:    The boy in the red shirt threw the green ball over the fence. 
   adjective changes- The boy in the green shirt threw the orange ball over the fence
   add an adjective  – The boy in the spotted green shirt threw the striped orange ball over the wooden fence. 
 
Change the noun:    The girl in the spotted green shirt threw the striped orange ball over the wooden fence.
 
Changed the verb:    The girl in the spotted green shirt tossed the striped orange ball over the wooden fence. 
 
When this challenge of copying a pattern is moved to copying the pattern within a paragraph it remains an exercise in learning how to write-
but when the notes a student takes are inserted into an essay without them being absorbed by the student to further a student’s thesis or topic the question of plagarism arises.  When taking notes, be careful to not only recognize the source, but also to put quotation marks around any material you lift directly- this way when you go to do your formal paper you will recall what were notes in synopsis form and which notes were actual quotes.  Your paper is not only an example of what you have read, but also an example of how you are interpreting the readings.  Think of writing as a chance to share what you are learning and focus on content – then mechanics will come. 
 
all the best from Ali

What

 

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Talking about Why I love the Olympics!

 

Imagine: almost time for the Summer Olympics 2016 and this blog and its sentiments still strong- no Hockey in the Summer- let us cheer for these athletes and share the excitement they are feeling! xo from Ali 

 

I wrote this on February 17, 2010- since it has received many hits, I am republishing it on May 10, 2011.  I work with children and adults, and each student is encouraged to find the joy in the learning process.  How does one become an Olympic athlete? Practice, Practice. Practice.  How does one achieve learning ideals?  Question and Practice.

Why I love the Olympics!

       Now anyone who knows me well can tell you I’m a great spectator if not the most coordinated when it comes to playing sports.  That is one of the reasons it is such a treat to be able to watch beauty in motion as the top athletes from around the world gather to compete and demonstrate their passion to all.  And not everyone performs perfectly. Sometimes it is heartbreaking to think of the hours that go into preparation and how one slip can be the end of a dream- or not- watching the recent downhill mogul skiers, male and female, I was reminded again of what it takes to be a true star.  When an athlete falls off course, rights herself, pauses to recollect, and then in a burst of positive energy offers the cheering crowd a spectacular finish each of us watching can learn from the determination, commitment and honour to their supporters that those who finish in spite of the mistake show.  And so one is reminded about control and practice, commitment and passion, and doing one’s best regardless of the circumstances.  Kudos of course to the winner of the first Gold for Canada, but Kudos as well to the ones who got up and finished the course (whichever event), reminding all of us at home why we watch- to see individuals striving for perfection, coached, encouraged, and ready to share just how amazing the human spirit can be.  For me anyhow, it is a lot more than hockey, it is determination, strength and perseverance.   At least that’s what I believe…

   Alison  (ali the English tutor) at: mytutoringspace@live.ca  (direct e-mail)

  

               

Why I love the Olympics!

 
  

       Now anyone who knows me well can tell you I’m a great spectator if not the most coordinated when it comes to playing sports.  That is one of the reasons it is such a treat to be able to watch beauty in motion as the top athletes from around the world gather to compete and demonstrate their passion to all.  And not everyone performs perfectly. Sometimes it is heartbreaking to think of the hours that go into preparation and how one slip can be the end of a dream- or not- watching the recent downhill mogul skiers, male and female, I was reminded again of what it takes to be a true star.  When an athlete falls off course, rights herself, pauses to recollect, and then in a burst of positive energy offers the cheering crowd a spectacular finish each of us watching can learn from the determination, commitment and honour to their supporters that those who finish in spite of the mistake show.  And so one is reminded about control and practice, commitment and passion, and doing one’s best regardless of the circumstances.  Kudos of course to the winner of the first Gold for Canada, but Kudos as well to the ones who got up and finished the course (whichever event), reminding all of us at home why we watch- to see individuals striving for perfection, coached, encouraged, and ready to share just how amazing the human spirit can be.  For me anyhow, it is a lot more than hockey, it is determination, strength and perseverance.   At least that’s what I believe…

 

   Alison at mytutoringspace

                Learning with Ali @ live .ca