#we the north

rubrics and open instruction versus direct instruction

First of all- both are necessary!

Direct instruction may have received a bad rap for a while, but little learning takes place without some form of clarification as to what is expected and how to make something happen.

Basketball Fever has been happening at our home these past few weeks, and being one who actually listens to the announcers in addition to enjoying watching the games, I have been able to focus on what the announcers pre-game and what onlookers pre-game suggest should happen to give their team the win! Sometimes the comments are wonderfully vague: “take more shots”; and I find myself visualizing the rubric that would acompany that statement” player took ball and aimed at basket” level 1, “player took ball and aimed at basket and ball hit rim” level 2, player took ball, aimed at basket but ball intercepted then other assist made basket -level 3, player took ball, aimed at baket and ball sailed clear through -level 4, with level 4 being the top expectation.  Then I considered if we simply handed the ball to players who had never been shown how to dribble, how to pass, how to toss the ball with a particular arm and wrist movement, that is minus any direct instruction and simply expected them to “do it!” Some might make the basket on their first throw, but would they know how to play the game?

For major and little league basketball comes with rules; and to play the game one needs more than “luck” though a little luck doesn’t hurt.  But first a clear understanding of the rules, the expectations, and how essential to the game each player’s participation is- raw talent plus practice, plus coaching, plus a willingness to make a mistake on the court and continue to play; direct instruction heard courtside when cheering coaches remember to use signals plus words to drown out any jeering bystanders, and practice that has led to near automatic responses – nearly automatic for in fact these quick turn arounds represent hours of practical review and the physical plus mental training that is demonstrated in seemingly effortless throws.

All deep learning demands this precision and dedication to craft and will by extension lead to a breadth of knowledge that in itself is the positive outcome of time spent in study- for we must remember that the major league basketball player does spend time studying his particular way of playing, or considering her individual way to improve- and in class or in preparing for a class this combination of direct instruction together with the more generalized rubric is still only the big picture focus on outcomes; students themselves being the players have to devise their own stretches, and then be encouraged to reach as far as possible and keep extending.

Cory Joseph NBA Stretch

 

 

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