Category Archives: ownership

Classroom reflections

Blended Learning as a Tool, not a Crutch

Best feeling for an educator? hearing actual excitement in the student’s voice about anything they are pleased to be accomplishing!

Blended learning in the classroom may make this possible, even if not every student has a personal learning device. But only recently have educators begun to share how much planning must actually go into a classroom activity that properly uses technology as an asset to the lesson, as an opportunity for self paced review, as a chance to challenge oneself in any of the core curriculum areas or strands, and as a tool for the teacher to instigate personal lesson plans. And like the dreaded accountable lesson plans of yesteryear, blended learning requires a skill, and most definitely time to prepare. 

When students recognize that “watch this video then do the exercises” is not an option but part of the course material, teachers offering material at the correct level and pace for the majority of students in the classroom are teachers who have first watched the video, practiced the accompanying exercises, and been able to evaluate their potential effectiveness in his or her particular learning environment, and then been willing to observe the variety of reactions to the self paced learning established.  This requires being a reflective practitioner, not simply supplying websites akin to the multiple printed pages of extra sheet-work which used to be (and may still be) in stacks for the access of the one’s who finished regular assigned exercises quickly.  The benefits of being a “seasoned educator” and currently working one to one means having time to hear the complaints which students from k-12 feel comfortable voicing in a safe and  non-school environment.  And indeed students may love technology, and for the younger set, the elementary students who are offered the bonus use of an open computer once all regular work is completed, they do enjoy that “freedom to play” though they tend to “play” on prescribed websites.  Older students though actually want to feel that any time spent on an educational pursuit translates into marks- and even with all the vocal squawking from educators that marks do not make the person, students actually enjoy some form of visible recognition for their hard work and some form of noting their own achievements!

Tests, quizzes, levels of accomplishment, challenges, problems to be solved, badges- formal academics, and Minecraft basics? Yes. Gaming and personal goals to get to the next level are the challenges set by anyone determined to practice and improve, and then practice some more, regardless of whether an athlete, an artist, a business owner or an academic! And when any type of advice is requested, the hope is that once applied, such advice will enable the asker to make it to the next level- else why bother asking if trial and error is sufficient? Because as Humans our society improves when we share knowledge; teachers have a value in the classroom and on the street. And students quickly learn that they can learn from their peers, from their parents, and from the formal and informal lesson plans that everyday life offers.  Not everyone is gearing directly toward higher academics, but the skills sets of focused activity, group and individual participation, personal motivation, and ability to inquire, to request information and to then personally evaluate the responses received- these are skills for Life. And Educators’ work load is only appearing to have been made easier with the concept of “blended learning” or the idea of students becoming “self-paced” for learners of all levels, and all ages, require solid challenges and a chance to also become “the instructor” sharing their personal understanding of any activity, being peer to peer guides, and whenever possible, even teaching their elders for in such a fluid learning environment the conversation may actually be “spontaneous” rather than contrived (look at a student teacher’s notes and one may find actual hoped for dialogue appearing in the lesson plans!) with the surprising by-product once removed from the goal, of increased marks and scores on those tests which are still the basic means to evaluate any learning endeavor.  

 

 

Using the “Why Not”Principle

Students have consistently asked me how to form a simple construct for assessing a method of experimentation be the experiment about academic work, or events that take place beyond the classroom.  While no one has any exact or foolproof “method” for assessing if any action is truly “safe,” the “why not” principle offers a legitimate way to self reflect before taking action– note: in emergency actions, this principle also will mean trusting one’s gut, as the more one indulges in self reflection, the stronger the “gut reaction” will be to help one recognize adverse situation when they materialize.

This method was both taught and demonstrated to me way back in my own childhood- it meant simply asking oneself, “why not” then pausing to write down or mentally list the reasons that something might be a “bad idea.”  And if one came up with more than two listings in the negative column- then don’t do it- especially if it might potentially hurt others.  Today this might even qualify as my “life lessons on empathy” since we are reworking so much that many an “old school” educator used to consider “compulsory knowledge,” the type that was expressed beginning in pre-school and reiterated throughout one’s academic career.

The “why not” principle also is often faster than listing all the “whys.” Plus students have shared that it is less ambiguous- less likely to be contorted by selfish pursuits. Give it a try- “why not?”

 

 

 

Seriously, dig deeper to find “success”

TEASING; and why there is a huge difference between children learning word play and playing with words, and actual taunting. Taunting doesn’t work in business relationships, either. The carrot before the donkey is an awful image because it reduces a human to the level of a beast of burden- a donkey- an animal traditionally used to conjure up the image of a “foolish beast”. Another word for a donkey- an “ass”-and to be “a donkey’s ass”- is an extreme insult.

To taunt is to hold out a promise and constantly withdraw it-think of children and adults at play. Sometimes parents will use bribery to encourage a certain form of behaviour; the award must then be received if the change in behaviour is to take effect. Otherwise, the game is not a game at all- it is an exercise in power, and simply proof of the power of one party over another. In this day and age where words like “collaboration” are a little too loosely spread about, what needs to be made clear, be it in business or personal life, is that teasing creates resentment, not community. Why then do we allow for, nay, even encourage between adults, behaviour which would be criticized in a kindergarten classroom?

Word play sample: “Pete and Repeat (or spell it Repete and then it is a visual homonym) were walking along the bridge; Pete fell off- who was left?” Answer: “Repeat” = child asking question gets to repeat it – ad infinitum – laughter will ensue for a brief moment- but if it continues…the word play has become mean play.

 In life doing the same task again and again, and here we get to paraphrase Einstein, becomes a ridiculous exercise- punishing rather than building someone up.

Yes, as tutor, I will have older students proof their work, recopying it until they are satisfied that it says what they wished to express- but this is not a futile exercise, it is an exercise meant to have students become owners of their thoughts, and willing to share these opinions in the public forum which they participate in- a school.

If as a community we are going to build up the youth in our care, we want them to feel confident to share their opinions, to express ideas, and to recognize when a piece of writing is making a point, to think about the points other authors are expressing, and to not be afraid to show that they too can communicate. Our corrections must address the separate areas of content and grammar and structure, while bearing in mind, that our students have experienced different lives from ours, and may read into a piece something separate, special to their understanding; which is why we must teach go to the text, find where you feel this idea is being developed, and do not be afraid to stand out from the crowd.

If I am going to share with students an image with a carrot in it, then this one seems more appropriate:

As Teachers we are entrusted with all the reasons for digging to find that success.

A shift into “Learning” (September)

A Shift image for Disruptive learning

But why is this disruptive? It used to be the “taken for granted!”-

I wrote that question with trepidation, I know that suggesting info- graphics are less powerful than they have been given credit for is almost educational blasphemy. I like the picture; I only wish that as educators we could see these images for the categories they have always been: core curriculum in a k-12 school*. Once again I am tempted to change a portion and suggest that it read – if we teachers are going to pay attention to it – “Are you ready to notice what may be going on in your room?” And if yes, then the poster is referring to us, calling educators “learners” – reminding us, that we too are learning in the room; we had better pay attention…

*it is story telling/ newspaper articles/ headlines/ humour/ organization skills (list making only 1 of many ways to organize) math, drama, motor skills, social media, science etc. etc…

Changing it up!

A blog worth sharing- and spaces that may in reality be in class rooms- with a caveat: chairs, desks, tables, technology, indoor /outdoor- what really must be in the room? IDEAS, and an energy for sharing ideas, learning ideas (from and with the students) and the sense of safety and respect that doesn’t come from tables, chairs, or technology, but is absorbed and passed on person to person, when learners, regardless of age and background feel that they too, can be a part of the inquiry process.

Having said that, this set of downloadable and free cards offered through the The Third Teacher website* makes a great reminder to us how we may play within the learning environment, changing it up a bit depending on varying student needs, and also encourage students to enjoy moving around their (our) learning stations.

The saying that “Change is as good as a rest” (variously attributed, but Churchill seems most popular) is easily debated – regardless- students quickly tend to flock to the same seating patterns, same spaces even when unassigned- a quick way to add a bit of extra challenge then would be to have them redesign the classroom every quarter- not merely empty and clean desks but make their own democratic suggestions about what could be a productive way of grouping (or ungrouping) desks etc. I know that movement around and through a space is essential not merely for fire drills, but also for the sense of belonging and ownership that results when one is able to touch and explore.
What do you think?

http://www.thethirdteacher.com/