Monthly Archives: March 2016

Participating

Things for Teachers to Remember:

Children and young adults are a “little bit of everything.”  Too often as we approach the final portion of an academic year, we are busy thinking tests, reviews, scores, and how to get it all done in time. We also have to evaluate the pupils, and suggest not merely for those upcoming reports but also for the files, the notes we make on the students and that allow us to intelligently discuss what worked, who worked, and how they worked throughout the academic year.

And I remember how with the youngest who were still at the picture book stage, we often used metaphor to get the point across that they as children were “allowed” to have all the emotions, to be all the fish in the pond, not merely a static “happy fish” or happy smiling face. Then as children complete middle school literally for many “trying on roles” and enter High School as the young adults we encounter, they are beginning to solidify an image- if not quite their true image. As Educators we have to keep encouraging them to continue to not restrict themselves into one specific personality trait or one specific mode of practice- for this I turn to the already famous to share how so many had more than one profession, more than one talent, more than one fixed and celluloid image.  And for those who have gone on to become rock stars, or sports heroes or even Nobel Scientists there is also their other characteristics as well: Einstein famously playing music, rock stars who become spokes people for environmental issues, Environmentalists painting or capturing their beloved outdoors in photographs or on film, and for the students skeptical if they can break their “molds” and the expectations of their peers we happily have a host of relatively recent young adult movies where the actors actually do try on other roles to the chagrin of peers and with at times extreme growing pains- these may be shared to generate free style brain storming and writing exercises.

And we as Educators ought to recall for ourselves those “hobbies” which once brought pleasure and remember to share our efforts with our students so as not to be one dimensional to them, either. When we care about students from a holistic perspective we share a little part of our personalities, too.  We might not be “the biggest fish in the pond” but we can keep swimming and demonstrating that each of us is a valuable part of the whole, for when we do so we validate our students’ efforts and make real the notion that yes it is good to try new challenges, to encourage ourselves as well as one another, and to perhaps even uncover hidden talents and new dreams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“Don’t split those”

The Pit boss overheard me and smiled, because the table was always busy and after my first day he, the Pit Boss, had learned that it added to customer’s satisfaction to understand the rules of the game instead of their sitting down and playing blind. Not only did my table see returning players, but also they were suggesting the table was “hot” even when they lost a hand! I even ventured to ask some of the “card sharks” why they returned if they lost what to me as a young dealer seemed like a great deal of money!

Yes I heard the standard, “your smile,” comments, but also I learned how many people appreciated the feeling of chance that seemed to enter the picture when they genuinely understood the rules and appreciated how luck entered – that added element of surprise which blesses one and which may accompany effort.

Now as an Educator when preparing workshops for Children and Adults, the rules are what I spend time clarifying- then it is “hands -off” to allow participants to fully engage in whichever action they are drawn to.  And recently I came across a wonderful book that reminded me how much the rules of Life vary and depend on chance; “you pays yer money and you take your chances,” when it comes to the ordinary stuff like falling in love, and growing a family, and changing direction a multitude of times. I am referring to a book which I reluctantly returned to the Library and now must purchase to add to my own Library- and it is not yet a classic having been published only recently: Anne-Marie Slaughter’s Unfinished Business; a story which chronicles her own decision to put children first and take a hiatus from a powerful political position, to focus on her family..  However her story is extra unique for single mothers, in that it suggests how even with a loving husband, and full bank account, making the decision was difficult  (for Ms. Slaughter) knowing that time away from professional endeavors can become no further opportunity for professional endeavors.  For Ms. Slaughter it was a choice; for many it is simply the only option.

Sometimes we stumble across an idea at just the right time.  That is serendipity, and recognizing the ways in which everything appears to be coming together we select a course that promises to provide the options we crave to continue moving forward; very soon, so many students will be donning cap and gown, or opting to not attend their own ceremonies, or simply breathing sighs of relief that a number of years of grind is being fulfilled and in a few weeks making their “commencement” a reality.  Were I to be giving a speech I would insert the hope that even if non-gamblers, they set sight on a few tables where they feel they could earn clear opportunity to proceed, to learn the basics, and then to take the newly acquired skills and understanding and -share them. 

  For we learn when we apply knowledge and when we see the results.  And we extend that learning when we apply reflection, and consider how to continuously improve.

Currently the image of Donald Trump, front runner in American politics and initially presumed unlikely as a politician, is proving again that it is not only money that allows one to take chances, it is also knowing the rules, and when it may be possible to not only gamble for fun, but to also invite others along and suggest they too take a chance and play for a while.

Mr. Trump and Ms. Slaughter are on different “teams,” and reading one and listening to the other gives insight into what a Democracy enables, not merely free speech but also the possibility of change. To an Educator that possibility is essential for it allows us to continue clarifying, continue sharing and continue to enjoy when those at “our table” take home some winnings.